BC TEAL Lower Mainland Regional Conference Highlights

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For a BC TEAL member and supporter like me who has often benefited from the PD events organized by the association, the decision to attend this year’s BC TEAL Lower Mainland Regional Conference was an easy one. The theme, “Rethinking Communication: Trends, Tools and Strategies”, also held great promise, since as language professionals we need to keep pace with the ways language itself changes and evolves and stay informed about the realities of our learners and their communicative needs. The Conference took place on Saturday, November 18th, at Columbia College. My choice of presentations to attend was clearly guided by my interest in the impact of technology on the ways we communicate and teach. It was a great learning experience, and I would like to share some of the highlights here.

My morning started on a high note, with Nathan Hall’s “Unscripted: Releasing the Potential of Authentic Listening in ELT”, delivered with his usual contagious enthusiasm. Nathan is a teacher trainer and EAP instructor for Douglas College and a Community Coordinator for Tutela, to mention just a few of the many roles he fulfills. As expected, I left with a list of technology tools and practical suggestions to put to good use in my class. The issue of using authentic listening input with language learners has always been controversial, even though both teachers and linguists will agree that comprehending “natural, real-time language use…is the target of virtually all language learners”(Michael Rost, 2011). When opting for purpose-written materials that are graded and scripted, however, teachers need to remember that these usually simplify syntactic structures and vocabulary, and sometimes use a reduced speech rate(Field, 2008). Authentic material can be used though, even with lower level learners, if the right task is used. Nathan introduced nine types of listening tasks(Vandergrift & Goh, 2012) that teachers can choose from when using authentic material: Restoration, Sorting(use information in a text to sequence, categorize, or rank items such as jumbled up texts and pictures), Comparison, Matching(listen to a number of short texts and match each one with the most appropriate theme given), Jigsaw Task, Narrative Completion, Embellishment, Evaluation, and Reconstruction. As promised, tech tools were also introduced and reviewed. VLC for example, is a free and reliable multimedia player that you might want to install on your computer. If you are tired of ads when watching videos, you have the choice of SafeShare.tv Are you a MAC user who wants to record a screencast video? All you have to do is open Quick Time. I encourage you to explore all of them here nathanghall.wordpress.com

The keynote speech, “Language and Social Media: Opportunities for the EAL Classroom” was delivered by Dr. Maite Taboada, Professor of Linguistics at Simon Fraser University. Her research areas are discourse analysis and computational linguistics. The speech started with the question, “Is the internet ruining the English language?”, followed by a resounding NO. We were reminded that language is creative and ever-evolving and, also, that understanding and being able to function in different registers is part of language learning and use. For a register approach in the classroom, which is a well established teaching approach, Dr. Taboada recommended a few resources, her favourite one being, “Discourse in English Language Education”, by John Flowerdew. It was explained that the online registers have developed to reflect the realities of a new form of communication brought about by the online medium, and they often display characteristics from both oral and written language. Interestingly enough, some of the language features they display and which people often point to as proof of “ruined language” are nothing new. Take alternative spelling, for example. To our surprise, we learned that OMG was first used by Winston Churchill, in 1917. LOL. In terms of opportunities to include social media in our EAL classrooms, Dr. Taboada believes there are quite a few: social media can be presented as a tool to communicate or can be used to introduce language activities, such as lower-stakes writing, with an emphasis on intelligibility over accuracy. Students can be asked to rewrite the same content in different media (write a blog post, a tweet, a Facebook status update), for example. They could also practice writing or speaking in different registers by writing a wiki entry or producing a podcast. Another very interesting point was made about the fact that social media users seem to interact differently across various social platforms, and people often wonder why we are “so nice on Facebook, so nasty on Twitter, and so ‘braggy’ on Instagram”. An analysis of the interactions taking place on these social media platforms using mainly the concept of register as defined by Systemic Functional Linguistics seems to provide a valid explanation. The last part of the speech was an introduction to Dr. Taboada’s research. We learned how sentiment analysis, which is automatic classification of texts based on subjective content, can help determine if online reviews and comments are positive or negative. One of the goals is to build a tool that can identify constructive comments and filter out toxic ones, especially hate speech. You can watch the recorded keynote speech here:

 

Anything that has to do with collocations is of great interest to me, so, attending “Using Online Tools to Improve EAL Students’ Written Communication”, delivered by Deogratias Nizonkiza, instructor at Douglas College, was a must. How many times have we heard our students say, “do a mistake” instead of “make a mistake”? Teaching collocations explicitly could be the answer to this type of problem. If I were to choose just one of the definitions shared by Deo, I would probably go with the one from the Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English, “the way words combine in a language to produce natural-sounding speech and writing”. Their importance is widely accepted in EAL contexts, and students trained to focus on collocations instead of individual words have a higher chance to fluently produce native-like utterances that are grammatically correct (Nation & Chung 2009). A number of typical language exercises can be used to raise awareness and help students practice collocation use, such as matching(verbs & nouns), underlining the verb(do/give/make me a favour), or inserting the collocation to complete the sentence. It is also useful to teach students the most common collocation types, such as adjective+noun, verb+noun, verb+adverb, etc. However, if we want the students to develop routines in their work with collocations, especially in the case of students with intermediate or advanced knowledge of English, we should probably teach them how to use corpora and online tools. Here are the tools Deo recommended: COCA; Word and phrase; Ozdic; Lextutor. Some of these tools, but not all, are rather sophisticated and can only be used by students with advanced knowledge of English. Ozdic, however, was rather enjoyed by my LINC 6 students. In the second part of the presentation, Deo shared the research he conducted at McGill University to investigate to what extent ESL students perceived corpora and online tools as useful for improving their academic vocabulary and for editing texts. The results were positive, which will hopefully encourage more teachers to give the deserved attention to collocations.

The decision to attend the conference came with the full reward of learning new things, having a chance to reflect on my own practices, and, not in the least, connecting with other passionate professionals and being energized by it. I am sure others felt the same; one lucky teacher even went home with the big prize, an iPad!

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wbBjVGk1Augusta Avram

EAL Educator

November 28 #LINCchat Summary: Research and Innovation in ELT

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How important is it for educators to keep up with current research in ELT? How relevant is ELT research in your own practice? What are some innovations in ELT that have changed/impacted your teaching practice? Have you engaged in action research? What helps and hinders you from incorporating current research and innovation into your classroom practice? How can we know if research is robust and has practical classroom applications?   

In this new format, the questions for this #LINCchat were kindly provided by #LINCchat enthusiasts on @Padlet. Thank-you to the educators who found time during the busy month of November to share their thoughts during this #LINCchat and those who added their thoughts after the chat: @PSCCESOL, @linguaLINC, @literacycaf, @JenArtan, and @thespreadingoak.   

Thank-you also to moderators, Svetlana Lupasco (@StanzaSL) and Bonnie Jean Nicholas (@EALstories) for facilitating the discussion and keeping us on track.  

Please find a summary of this chat below. To read it, hover over the Twitter bird next to the subtopics in the image below. The interactive image was made with Canva and ThingLink 

To read all the tweets on this topic, follow the complete discussion HERE.       

New to #LINCchat?   

If you have never participated in #LINCchat before, go to www.lincchat.ca for more information. #LINCchats occur every other Tuesday, with the occasional Friday.  If you have any ideas for topics or have comments about #LINCchat, please send @StanzaSL or @EALstories a tweet or post a message on Tutela. Our next #LINCchat will be on a special day. Please join us on Monday, December 11th at 6-7 p.m. PST or 9-10 p.m. EST to share your ideas on self-care. Please let others know about #LINCchat. Feel free to use the #LINCchat hashtag between chats to share thoughts and links with others.   


Jen Bio PicJennifer has been teaching in the LINC Program for more than 10 years. She loves using Twitter to stay connected as a mother, an educator and an active citizen. 

Twitter: @jennifermchow

Ideas to Printed Page: Getting Started in Publishing – A BC TEAL Webinars Session

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Copy of Copy of Intercultural Strategies in the EAL Classroom BC TEAL Webinar Series-2

Many teachers have ideal skill sets for creating teaching and learning materials and frequently put them to good use in their own classrooms. However, what are the next steps to move into professional publishing for a broader audience? More than ever before, there are a range of options from self-publishing, creating small-scale materials sold on sites that cater to teachers one PDF at a time, to working with a university press or an established publisher. In this shamelessly autobiographical talk, Dr. Ken Beatty discusses projects with publishers in Asia, Australia, England and North America. He outlines a range of options, the necessary skills, and the steps that potential authors and materials developers might take, as well as the common pitfalls to avoid.

Dr. Ken Beatty, Anaheim University TESOL Professor, has worked in secondary schools and universities in Asia, the Middle East, and North and South America, lecturing on language teaching and computer-assisted language learning from the primary through university levels and is author of 130 textbooks. He has given 300+ teacher-training sessions and 100+ conference presentations in 33 countries. His most recent books are Learning English for Academic Purposes for Pearson Canada.

November 14 #LINCchat Summary: Building an Inclusive Community with Language Learners

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In her TED Talk, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, expresses her thoughts on “The Danger of a Single Story”: 

I’ve always felt that it is impossible to engage properly with a place or a person without engaging with all of the stories of that place and that person. The consequence of the single story is this: It robs people of dignity. It makes our recognition of our equal humanity difficult. It emphasizes how we are different rather than how we are similar. 

During the November 14 #LINCchat, Augusta Avram (@LINCInstructor) and Bonnie Jean Nicholas (@EALstories) facilitated an important discussion about including multiple voices and stories to develop inclusive communities.  

Thank-you to the educators who shared their perspectives on inclusive education in ELT: @PSCCESOL, @thespreadingoak, @vislief, @StanzaSL, @gabyG_jolie, @jennifermchow, @seburnt, @JoyOFESL, @ambartosik, @ESLlibrary 

Please find a summary of this chat below. To read it, hover over the Twitter bird next to the subtopics in the image below. The interactive image was made with Canva and ThingLink 

To read all the tweets on this topic, follow the complete discussion HERE.      

New to #LINCchat?   

If you have never participated in #LINCchat before, go to www.lincchat.ca for more information. #LINCchats occur every other Tuesday, with the occasional Friday.  If you have any ideas for topics or have comments about #LINCchat, please send @StanzaSL or @EALstories a tweet or post a message on Tutela. Our next #LINCchat will be on Tuesday, November 28th at 6-7 p.m. PST or 9-10 p.m. EST. Please let others know about #LINCchat. Feel free to use the #LINCchat hashtag between chats to share thoughts and links with others.   


Jen Bio PicJennifer has been teaching in the LINC Program for more than 10 years. She loves using Twitter to stay connected as a mother, an educator and an active citizen. 

Twitter: @jennifermchow

October 24 #LINCchat Summary: Task-based Language Teaching and Skills Development

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One of the “tasks” of participating in a #LINCchat is following the conversations that participants have on a #CdnELT topic and joining in when you feel comfortable. As it turned out, this might have been more difficult than usual as the topic of the chat, Task-based Language Teaching or TBLT, inspired fast-paced discussions about its challenges and benefits as well as the generous sharing of ideas and resources.  

Thank-you to moderators, Augusta Avram (@LINCInstructor filling in for @StanzaSL), and Bonnie Jean Nicholas (@EALstories filling in for @nathanghall) for facilitating the discussion and keeping us on track.  

Thank-you also to the passionate educators who shared their perspectives during the last #LINCchat on Oct. 24th: @thespreadingoak, @DawnTorvik, @JoyOfESL, @YuliyaESL, @gabyG_jolie, @vislief, @KraseNetzel, @CameronJMoser, @Corrie0330, @ElleninSaigon, ‏ @danalbergman, @linguaLINC, and @ambartosik. It was great to see new and seasoned #LINCchatters take part in the discussion. If this only whet your appetite for more, follow @TBLT_chat on Twitter. 

Please find a summary of this chat below. To read it, hover over the Twitter bird next to the subtopics in the image below. The interactive image was made with Canva and ThingLink 

To read all the tweets on this topic, follow the complete discussion HERE.      

New to #LINCchat?   

If you have never participated in #LINCchat before, go to www.lincchat.ca for more information. #LINCchats occur every other Tuesday, with the occasional Friday.  If you have any ideas for topics or have comments about #LINCchat, please send @StanzaSL or @EALstories a tweet or post a message on Tutela. Our next #LINCchat will be on Tuesday, November 14th at 6-7 p.m. PST or 9-10 p.m. EST. Please let others know about #LINCchat. Feel free to use the #LINCchat hashtag between chats to share thoughts and links with others.   


Jen Bio Pic

Jennifer has been teaching in the LINC Program for more than 10 years. She loves using Twitter to stay connected as a mother, an educator and an active citizen. 

Twitter: @jennifermchow

“ESL Students and Academic Dishonesty” – a BC TEAL Webinars session

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As Canadian education becomes more and more popular with international students, their struggles with fitting in to Canadian academic culture become ever more important. In this webinar, Dave Henderson presents his research into causes and cures for academic misconduct by international students. Through analyzing a variety of peer-reviewed publications, Dave identified possible causes and formulated solutions that can be implemented in both public and private schools. Join him for a presentation and Q&A that will offer suggestions on how to reduce instances of academic misconduct.

An ESL teacher since 2005, Dave recently graduated from Royal Roads University with a M.A. in Intercultural and International Communication. In addition to his major project, about academic misconduct among ESL students, he received the Public Ethnography prize for his podcast on authenticity in swing dancing. Professionally, his interests include academic preparation, business language, reading, writing, and vocabulary. His students have gone on to work and study in a wide variety of locations and subjects. Outside of the classroom, he enjoys jazz music and swing dancing, reading, and cycling.

You can find the slides to this session on Dave’s website.

October 10 #LINCchat Summary: Back-up Plans for Class

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Have you ever prepared the “perfect” lesson plan only to find out that the photocopier is jammed, or the Internet is down? Do you have a plan B, C, D or E? How well are you prepared for the unexpected to happen in class?  

When things are not going smoothly, how do you decide when it’s time to go to plan B? Do you adjust your plan, or do you abandon your original plan? These are a few of the questions we discussed with a small but passionate group of educators during the last #LINCchat on Oct. 10: @JoyOfESL, @danalbergman, @seburnt, @JenArtan , @jennifermchow and @LearnanaBodnar.

Thank-you to moderators, Svetlana Lupasco (@StanzaSL), and Bonnie Jean Nicholas (@EALstories filling in for @nathanghall) for facilitating the conversation.

To read the summary, hover over the Twitter bird next to the subtopics in the image below. The interactive image was made with Canva and ThingLink.

To read all the tweets on this topic, follow the complete discussion HERE.      

New to #LINCchat?   

If you have never participated in #LINCchat before, go to www.lincchat.ca for more information. #LINCchats occur every other Tuesday, with the occasional Friday.  If you have any ideas for topics or have comments about #LINCchat, please send @StanzaSL or @EALstories a tweet or post a message on Tutela. Our next #LINCchat will be on Tuesday, October 24th at 6-7 p.m. PST or 9-10 p.m. EST. Please let others know about #LINCchat. Feel free to use the #LINCchat hashtag between chats to share thoughts and links with others.   


Jen Bio PicJennifer has been teaching in the LINC Program for more than 10 years. She loves using Twitter to stay connected as a mother, an educator and an active citizen. 

Twitter: @jennifermchow