Understanding the world of BC TEAL Publishing

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By Azzam Premji

Image sourced from https://www.picserver.org/highway-signs2/p/publish.html

Introduction

BC TEAL provides three ways for you to share your English as an Additional Language (EAL) teaching ideas: an academic journal, a community newsletter and a blog. Interestingly, BC TEAL does not charge readers for viewing the published articles since it believes in sharing expertise. In addition, copyright of the articles published in BC TEAL’s publications remains with the author. Why not try publishing with BC TEAL? You will find below a diagram that summarizes the methods of publishing employed at BC TEAL.

Most difficult to publish1. Journal – supports EAL scholarship
a. Research based article
b. Opinion Essay
c. Book Review
2. Newsletter – supports the greater EAL community
Easiest to publish3. Blog – supports EAL teachers

BC TEAL Journal

According to Douglas (2019), the BC TEAL Journal fosters scholarship and was originally inspired by other TESOL affiliate journals such as the NYS TESOL Journal and the CATESOL Journal. The BC TEAL Journal contains three types of writing: a research-based article that has never been published; an opinion essay which connects theory to practice; and a book review of a recently published EAL book. Scott states that “submissions are double-anonymous peer reviewed”, and this means that two peers review the submission while the author remains anonymous to them. Submissions also go through a process of editing, resulting in accepted articles being published in eight to twelve months.

Here are some other details related to writing for the journal:

  1. Research-based article (about 8,000 words)

Academic format: 

  • Title, abstract, literature review, discussion, conclusion and references
  • Academic writing which includes APA citations

B. Opinion Essay (about 4,000 words)

Journalistic style:

  • Title, abstract, discussion, conclusion and references
  • Academic writing which includes APA citations

C. Book Review (about 1,000 words)

Academic format: 

  • Title, abstract, discussion, conclusion and references
  • Academic writing which includes APA citations

In addition, all BC TEAL Journal submissions generally follow the citation and reference format suggested by the American Psychology Association, 6th Edition, according to the “Author Guidelines”. Additionally, the journal has its own style which includes Canadian spelling. For more information about how to create APA citations and references, please check the Purdue Online Writing Lab.

If you are interested in having an article published in the BC TEAL Journal, you may also wish to view a recorded Webinar on the topic. The video provides you with an overview of some journal themes, and it describes the mentoring process of being published. To see all previous BC TEAL Journal articles, go to the BC TEAL website (bcteal.org) > News and Publications > BC TEAL Journal. For more information on submitting a journal article, click on “For Authors”. New submissions that fit the scope and focus of the journal are welcome.

TEAL News (about 800 words)

TEAL News is BC TEAL’s newsletter. The newsletter publishes shorter articles from around 500 to 1,000 words long. These articles can be on a variety of topics related to teaching English as an additional language, such as descriptions of classroom activities, short research reports, reflections on teaching and learning, and conference reports. Newsletter articles should be written in a reader-friendly style that appeals to a wide audience. Sources, if used, are cited and referenced using the APA format, like the journal. For more information on the newsletter, kindly send an email to editor@bcteal.org with your queries.

The BLOG (up to 500 words)

The final method of publishing is the BC TEAL Blog. It is the easiest way to engage in idea sharing with other EAL practitioners. You may wish to consider the following format:

  • Title, introduction, discussion, references (if any)
  • Hyperlinks
  • Question(s) that ask for readership engagement
  • Short bio of the author
  • Picture(s) that illustrate your topic ought to follow the Creative Commons License 

If you do use sources, please cite your writing and provide a reference using the APA format. Also, remember to cite your images. Providing tag words and a category for classification are appreciated and allow readers to find your article more easily. 

To get more ideas of what to blog about, check out the ones produced by TESOL International Association or TESL Ontario, which are mainly innovative teaching tips. If you have an idea for a blog post, contact admin@bcteal.org, and you will be put in touch with the Social Media Committee Chair.

Conclusion

You may want to start off your publishing experience by posting a blog. You can then gradually contribute to the Newsletter and Journal. Whatever publication you decide to write in, there is always an audience waiting to read about new ideas and research. 

Please reply to this blog

Did you find this post useful? Let us know in the comment section; we would love to hear from you.

References

Bio of the author

Azzam is a Canadian EAL teacher who has 10+ years of experience teaching in Japan, Sweden, Poland, Canada, England and the United Arab Emirates. He holds a masters of education degree in Education Technology and TESOL.

Building your professional experience (even during a pandemic!): All you need is a BC TEAL membership

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By: Vera Ziwei Wu

Teachers are no strangers to contracts, jumping between jobs, and giving more than what is asked of us to support learners in various settings. As we get so caught up in our daily work, slowly, we become more isolated in our jobs, which challenges our mental health and limits our imaginations. This happens more often now with COVID isolating us from others. 

On the other hand, trying to attend a virtual conference or webinar is becoming increasingly difficult. In addition to not having enough time, we are so overwhelmed with the amount of work we invest in virtual communication, learning and teaching, as well as safe in-person teaching whenever possible, that we rarely want to stay at a computer when we don’t have to. How do we stay connected through small ways to ease our professional isolation while continuously developing ourselves in the profession? I have a few ideas for you.

Engage with your colleagues

You don’t have to do the work all alone! Instead, provide the opportunities for your colleagues to help you by starting a conversation and brainstorming new ideas together to address shared concerns or issues. I have met so many amazing teachers, administrators and people who work in leadership roles supporting teachers through BC TEAL events, and they have been, and still are, my inspirations to stay engaged and support others.

Building a circle of support around you and sharing resources, ideas, and opportunities within the group is a great way to share the workload, stay connected and have fun. Don’t have enough supportive colleagues around you? You can join BC TEAL (for FREE till Mar 1, 2021 if you’re currently unemployed) and get connected!

Present your resources to others (it can be informal and fun!)

If you are a BC TEAL member, you might have already been attending some of the amazing free webinars. The webinars can be almost anything relevant to TESOL, from resources to advocacy, from learner wellbeing to teacher support. Presenters have told us they were terribly scared at the beginning but felt incredibly good after working with us and making the session happen for their colleagues. It’s also zero-cost professional development that you can include on your CV!

BC TEAL can be easily reached at admin@bcteal.org. If you have an idea and are not sure if it will be a good fit, please do connect with us, as we may be able to help with further developing the session and support you with the technical part of the webinar – what better place to start? 

Join a committee 

Why do you feel so good after a productive meeting? It’s the constructive work, as well as the connection and the community for a cause you care about. You may or may not have been very engaged in a committee before, and the idea of joining one might be intimidating. If this is how you feel, try and start with a BC TEAL committee. 

If I have successfully persuaded you, here is the good news: Many of our committees are currently looking for new leaders! Check out our Facebook page and Instagram for posts with more details on the committees, and leave a comment if you have any questions. If you’re not sure which committee is the best fit for you, try this survey and we’ll help you find the right one!

Contribute to the BC TEAL Blog and TEAL News

Writing for the BC TEAL Blog and TEAL News is another place where you can share your resources, experiences and stories with others. This recent newsletter might give you an idea of the diverse topics and styles of writing we may include. No research is required, and all we need is you with ideas on classroom activities, anecdotes and stories about your experiences, or reports about talks, seminars, or conferences that you’ve attended, reflections on English language learning or anything else your fellow colleagues should know about! Got an idea? Email the editor, Scott Douglas, with your ideas at editor@bcteal.org now!

Teaching during a pandemic can be very challenging, so let BC TEAL make professional development easier for you. All you need is a BC TEAL membership that provides you access to resources, connections and opportunities. Join or renew now at https://www.bcteal.org/register-now/

From the newsletter: Refugee Rights Day – EAL Act!on

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refugees

Image credit: iStock.com/RadekProcyk

On April 4th, BC TEAL launched a nationwide campaign in celebration of Refugee Rights Day. This campaign connected the relationship between security of person to a sense of belonging and inclusion in our diverse communities – not just for refugees, but for all individuals. It included webinars and an activity package for teachers and was intended to highlight our commonalities and the importance of feeling safe and accepted for who we are.

How do you apply an intercultural lens to Refugee Rights Day? It starts with how people identify themselves and how they identify others. The EAL classroom provides a primary community, and a good place to start strengthening that sense of community is by getting to know each other. We often don’t know much about each other’s cultural background, ways of doing things or personal histories. In a classroom context, teachers making time and space for the group to be curious about and open to each other is key to modelling and growing intercultural sensitivity as well as to prepare learners to find greater acceptance in the community at large. This ability is as important as language if our goal is to promote healthy, inclusive and diverse communities.

These themes seem weighty, but the activities provided in BC TEAL’s Refugee Rights Day Activity Package were intended to foster a feeling of commonality while at the same time acknowledging difference in an enjoyable way. They also aimed to raise awareness of what inclusion, community and diversity mean to our students and to explore how we can “do” these in our daily interactions.

Teacher comments:

Jennifer: “Initially, students wondered so why are we talking about this? Yes, it was Refugee Rights Day, but these are all broader themes. Students said ‘we’re really glad we’re learning this. It helps me think differently. It’s important to learn about’. It was neat – the next day we had a refugee student enter the class and is now a part of our classroom community.”

Augusta: “I like to share my own identity story as someone who came to a new country. It doesn’t matter what the reason is for you being here. You are here now and it’s a difficult time, but there are commonalities… I wanted this activity package to be about all of us.”

Debra: “The whole experience was very positive… It gave a better sense of what diversity is and how we can be included because we do have things in common. It opened the door to other possibilities, to meeting new people and other Canadians. That we can see beyond what’s on the outside.”

Leanna: ‘The student’s especially liked being divided into groups to work on their poster board that reflected what they deemed as “Social Inclusion”. They liked the creativity, the visuals, the variety and freedom of choice, cutting, pasting and overall enjoyment of working together to create a positive message as a group.”

Tanya: “I did have refugees in the class and they were okay with the pictures. I felt comfortable because my parents were refugees also, so I talked about my parents living in a camp for 3 years. I thought it was nice to finish with an optimistic picture – Welcome to Canada!”

To access the package and accompanying image bank, please visit Refugee Rights Day: Take Act!on. Good luck on your intercultural journey and, if you do use the materials, we’d love to hear from you.

For the full article, please see the Summer 2017 issue of the BC TEAL Newsletter.


AAEAAQAAAAAAAAQXAAAAJGZiYTFmNDEzLWU4NjctNDAzMC05YTQ2LWUzMjg4ZjA1Y2YyYgTaslim Damji is the developer of BC TEAL’s Refugee Rights Day package. She has an MA from King’s College, London and two decades of international teaching, teacher training, and research experience. Taslim is the manager of Intercultural Trainings through MOSAIC Works.