BC TEAL Webinars “Microskills and Foundational Skills for Sociocultural Competency”

Standard

Feeling awkward and different, or like a ‘fish out of water’, is often how people new to a culture describe interpersonal interactions. For success at school and work, and in life overall, it is necessary to interact effectively with others in order to maintain essential relationships. This ability is described as Sociocultural Competency.

In her presentation, Jane discussed and demonstrated nonverbal and verbal microskills and foundational skills essential for Sociocultural Competency. She also made suggestions for how to approach classroom ‘group work’ as a substitute for a workplace activity.

Jane Forward teaches communication courses at Vancouver Community College, currently in the health science programs and previously in business, hairstyling and automotive programs. She teachers sociocultural competency to new immigrants, established immigrants, and people raised in Vancouver. This competency allows them to join workplaces which in themselves are new cultures needing people with such expertise.

Session Recording

Slides

Jane Forward SocioCultural Competency.jpg

Advertisement

BC TEAL Webinars: Moving Beyond Pronunciation Pairs: Teaching the Rhythm of Canadian English

Standard

Moving Beyond Pronunciation Pairs BC TEAL Webinar Series

Are you reluctant to teach pronunciation due to the variation in your learners’ needs? Don’t be! You can create valuable aha moments for students of various backgrounds by teaching them the pronunciation features of syllable and sentence stress. They will suddenly understand why others often do not understand them, why they often don’t understand others, and why English spelling and grammar are often difficult to learn. In this webinar recording, you will learn key features of the rhythm of Canadian English, a suggested progression for teaching it, and recommendations for teaching materials.

Cari-Ann Roberts Gotta is one of BC TEAL’s regional representatives. She holds a Master’s degree in Adult Education from UBC and a TESOL diploma from Vancouver Community College. Cari-Ann has been teaching in the field of English Language Learning for the past 12 years and currently works for Selkirk College in Nelson. Over the years she has developed her interest and skills in teaching pronunciation and has shared her learning with many language instructors and literacy tutors through numerous conference and training workshops.

Slides (click on the image below):

BCTEAL pronunciation webinar

Video:

BC TEAL Lower Mainland Regional Conference Highlights

Standard

Screen Shot 2017-12-12 at 10.13.02 AM

For a BC TEAL member and supporter like me who has often benefited from the PD events organized by the association, the decision to attend this year’s BC TEAL Lower Mainland Regional Conference was an easy one. The theme, “Rethinking Communication: Trends, Tools and Strategies”, also held great promise, since as language professionals we need to keep pace with the ways language itself changes and evolves and stay informed about the realities of our learners and their communicative needs. The Conference took place on Saturday, November 18th, at Columbia College. My choice of presentations to attend was clearly guided by my interest in the impact of technology on the ways we communicate and teach. It was a great learning experience, and I would like to share some of the highlights here.

My morning started on a high note, with Nathan Hall’s “Unscripted: Releasing the Potential of Authentic Listening in ELT”, delivered with his usual contagious enthusiasm. Nathan is a teacher trainer and EAP instructor for Douglas College and a Community Coordinator for Tutela, to mention just a few of the many roles he fulfills. As expected, I left with a list of technology tools and practical suggestions to put to good use in my class. The issue of using authentic listening input with language learners has always been controversial, even though both teachers and linguists will agree that comprehending “natural, real-time language use…is the target of virtually all language learners”(Michael Rost, 2011). When opting for purpose-written materials that are graded and scripted, however, teachers need to remember that these usually simplify syntactic structures and vocabulary, and sometimes use a reduced speech rate(Field, 2008). Authentic material can be used though, even with lower level learners, if the right task is used. Nathan introduced nine types of listening tasks(Vandergrift & Goh, 2012) that teachers can choose from when using authentic material: Restoration, Sorting(use information in a text to sequence, categorize, or rank items such as jumbled up texts and pictures), Comparison, Matching(listen to a number of short texts and match each one with the most appropriate theme given), Jigsaw Task, Narrative Completion, Embellishment, Evaluation, and Reconstruction. As promised, tech tools were also introduced and reviewed. VLC for example, is a free and reliable multimedia player that you might want to install on your computer. If you are tired of ads when watching videos, you have the choice of SafeShare.tv Are you a MAC user who wants to record a screencast video? All you have to do is open Quick Time. I encourage you to explore all of them here nathanghall.wordpress.com

The keynote speech, “Language and Social Media: Opportunities for the EAL Classroom” was delivered by Dr. Maite Taboada, Professor of Linguistics at Simon Fraser University. Her research areas are discourse analysis and computational linguistics. The speech started with the question, “Is the internet ruining the English language?”, followed by a resounding NO. We were reminded that language is creative and ever-evolving and, also, that understanding and being able to function in different registers is part of language learning and use. For a register approach in the classroom, which is a well established teaching approach, Dr. Taboada recommended a few resources, her favourite one being, “Discourse in English Language Education”, by John Flowerdew. It was explained that the online registers have developed to reflect the realities of a new form of communication brought about by the online medium, and they often display characteristics from both oral and written language. Interestingly enough, some of the language features they display and which people often point to as proof of “ruined language” are nothing new. Take alternative spelling, for example. To our surprise, we learned that OMG was first used by Winston Churchill, in 1917. LOL. In terms of opportunities to include social media in our EAL classrooms, Dr. Taboada believes there are quite a few: social media can be presented as a tool to communicate or can be used to introduce language activities, such as lower-stakes writing, with an emphasis on intelligibility over accuracy. Students can be asked to rewrite the same content in different media (write a blog post, a tweet, a Facebook status update), for example. They could also practice writing or speaking in different registers by writing a wiki entry or producing a podcast. Another very interesting point was made about the fact that social media users seem to interact differently across various social platforms, and people often wonder why we are “so nice on Facebook, so nasty on Twitter, and so ‘braggy’ on Instagram”. An analysis of the interactions taking place on these social media platforms using mainly the concept of register as defined by Systemic Functional Linguistics seems to provide a valid explanation. The last part of the speech was an introduction to Dr. Taboada’s research. We learned how sentiment analysis, which is automatic classification of texts based on subjective content, can help determine if online reviews and comments are positive or negative. One of the goals is to build a tool that can identify constructive comments and filter out toxic ones, especially hate speech. You can watch the recorded keynote speech here:

 

Anything that has to do with collocations is of great interest to me, so, attending “Using Online Tools to Improve EAL Students’ Written Communication”, delivered by Deogratias Nizonkiza, instructor at Douglas College, was a must. How many times have we heard our students say, “do a mistake” instead of “make a mistake”? Teaching collocations explicitly could be the answer to this type of problem. If I were to choose just one of the definitions shared by Deo, I would probably go with the one from the Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of English, “the way words combine in a language to produce natural-sounding speech and writing”. Their importance is widely accepted in EAL contexts, and students trained to focus on collocations instead of individual words have a higher chance to fluently produce native-like utterances that are grammatically correct (Nation & Chung 2009). A number of typical language exercises can be used to raise awareness and help students practice collocation use, such as matching(verbs & nouns), underlining the verb(do/give/make me a favour), or inserting the collocation to complete the sentence. It is also useful to teach students the most common collocation types, such as adjective+noun, verb+noun, verb+adverb, etc. However, if we want the students to develop routines in their work with collocations, especially in the case of students with intermediate or advanced knowledge of English, we should probably teach them how to use corpora and online tools. Here are the tools Deo recommended: COCA; Word and phrase; Ozdic; Lextutor. Some of these tools, but not all, are rather sophisticated and can only be used by students with advanced knowledge of English. Ozdic, however, was rather enjoyed by my LINC 6 students. In the second part of the presentation, Deo shared the research he conducted at McGill University to investigate to what extent ESL students perceived corpora and online tools as useful for improving their academic vocabulary and for editing texts. The results were positive, which will hopefully encourage more teachers to give the deserved attention to collocations.

The decision to attend the conference came with the full reward of learning new things, having a chance to reflect on my own practices, and, not in the least, connecting with other passionate professionals and being energized by it. I am sure others felt the same; one lucky teacher even went home with the big prize, an iPad!

DSC_0942


wbBjVGk1Augusta Avram

EAL Educator

Ideas to Printed Page: Getting Started in Publishing – A BC TEAL Webinars Session

Standard

Copy of Copy of Intercultural Strategies in the EAL Classroom BC TEAL Webinar Series-2

Many teachers have ideal skill sets for creating teaching and learning materials and frequently put them to good use in their own classrooms. However, what are the next steps to move into professional publishing for a broader audience? More than ever before, there are a range of options from self-publishing, creating small-scale materials sold on sites that cater to teachers one PDF at a time, to working with a university press or an established publisher. In this shamelessly autobiographical talk, Dr. Ken Beatty discusses projects with publishers in Asia, Australia, England and North America. He outlines a range of options, the necessary skills, and the steps that potential authors and materials developers might take, as well as the common pitfalls to avoid.

Dr. Ken Beatty, Anaheim University TESOL Professor, has worked in secondary schools and universities in Asia, the Middle East, and North and South America, lecturing on language teaching and computer-assisted language learning from the primary through university levels and is author of 130 textbooks. He has given 300+ teacher-training sessions and 100+ conference presentations in 33 countries. His most recent books are Learning English for Academic Purposes for Pearson Canada.

“ESL Students and Academic Dishonesty” – a BC TEAL Webinars session

Standard

DMCOmrtU8AAWXyQ

As Canadian education becomes more and more popular with international students, their struggles with fitting in to Canadian academic culture become ever more important. In this webinar, Dave Henderson presents his research into causes and cures for academic misconduct by international students. Through analyzing a variety of peer-reviewed publications, Dave identified possible causes and formulated solutions that can be implemented in both public and private schools. Join him for a presentation and Q&A that will offer suggestions on how to reduce instances of academic misconduct.

An ESL teacher since 2005, Dave recently graduated from Royal Roads University with a M.A. in Intercultural and International Communication. In addition to his major project, about academic misconduct among ESL students, he received the Public Ethnography prize for his podcast on authenticity in swing dancing. Professionally, his interests include academic preparation, business language, reading, writing, and vocabulary. His students have gone on to work and study in a wide variety of locations and subjects. Outside of the classroom, he enjoys jazz music and swing dancing, reading, and cycling.

You can find the slides to this session on Dave’s website.

ATESL conference and joint BC TEAL / ATESL Educational Technology Summit (ETS) – October 20-21, 2017

Standard

Bookmark this page! We will be posting videos from the keynote speakers of the joint ATESL / BCTEAL Educational Technology Summit.


Due to network issues, live streaming for this session will not be available. We will be recording the session and uploading it as soon as we can. Sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

Friday, October 20th, 7:15-8:15am PDT / 8:15-9:15am MDT – Dr. Bonny Norton, “Identity, Investment, and English Language Learning in an Unequal Digital World.”


Due to restrictions, we are unable to provide live streaming or recording of this session.

Friday, October 20th, 12:15-1:15pm PDT / 1:15-2:15pm MDT – Dr. Darren Lund, “Becoming a Better Advocate for All Learners: Infusing Social Justice in our Practice.”


Saturday, October 21st, 7:15-8:15am PDT / 8:15-9:15am MDT – Dr. Greg Kessler, “Preparing Teachers for the Future: Designing Instruction with Automated and Intelligent Tools.”

https://bccampus.ca/2015/01/06/labyrinths-for-learning/

“Embarking on Adventure: Planning, Proposing and Executing Your Conference Presentation” – a BC TEAL Webinars session

Standard

Do you have an innovative classroom idea you would like to share with your peers? Perhaps you have an interest in replying to a BC TEAL conference call for presenters and would like some tried and true tips to get started.

Thank you to seasoned presenters Jennifer and Tanya for an informative session that took us through the steps. Participants were encouraged to request a mentor to review their draft proposal and offer comments and support prior to submission. Online options for connecting with a mentor will be made available, so regional participation is encouraged. This mentorship opportunity will only be available for three weeks from the date of the webinar. (Disclaimer: Mentoring process is a support function and does not guarantee acceptance of a conference proposal.)

Byte-Sized PD: 2017 BC TEAL Annual Conference

Standard

 

18358812_1262470233860135_1533647379811983012_o

At the 2017 BC TEAL Annual Conference, we gave people a simple task: video record a short summary of what they were presenting. Over the past few months, we have been sharing these videos through Twitter and Facebook. If you haven’t seen them or have missed some along the way, here are all eight videos in no particular order.

Penny Ur

Andy Curtis

Vesna Radivojevic

Taslim Damji

Seonaigh MacPherson

Ken Beatty

Nathan Hall

Jill Hadfield

“An Indigenous Strategy in the ESL Classroom” – A BC TEAL Webinars session with Amy Abe

Standard

June 21 is National Aboriginal Day in Canada. To explore and extend this theme, what are ESL instructors doing to respond to Truth and Reconciliation in the language training classroom? Come share in our journey of how we are exploring ways of including Indigenous ways of knowing in TESL practices, including changes to curriculum, content, teaching, and connecting with the local Indigenous community. This was a very well received session at our recent conference, and we were very pleased to have Amy come back for our BC TEAL webinars series.

Throughout the evening, some resources were shared by Amy as well as some of the participants:

“An Army of Problem Solvers” – this book was mentioned by Amy towards the end of her session.

“First Peoples: Principles of Learning” – this is a poster shared by Karen Rauser.

“Gradual release of responsibility” – shared by Scott Douglas.

City of Vancouver “The Dialogues Project” – shared by Brenda Lohrenz.

Province of British Columbia “Aboriginal Education in British Columbia” – shared by Karen Rauser.

“First Peoples: Learning Materials for Newcomers” – Tutela collection shared by Nathan Hall.